Central Thalamic Stimulation for Traumatic Brain Injury

Central Thalamic Stimulation for Traumatic Brain Injury

National Institutes for Health

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) afflicts hundreds of thousands of Americans each year, producing chronic cognitive disabilities that lack effective treatment. Preliminary studies with TBI patients and non-human primates suggest that these cognitive disabilities may be due to disrupted circuit function in the brain, specifically involving impaired connections between the thalamus and the frontal cortex. Working with a group of TBI patients who can function independently but remain limited by chronic cognitive impairment, the study team aims to build on these studies, using the latest device technology to deliver deep brain stimulation to the thalamus. The researchers hope to obtain a variety of behavioral and electrophysiological data to inform development of a next-generation device therapy for cognitive impairment associated with TBI.

This clinical study is led by Dr. Butson from the Medical College of Wisconsin and other team members, including Nicholas Schiff M.D. at Cornell University, Joseph Giacino Ph.D. at the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Jaimie Henderson M.D. at Stanford and Andre Machado M.D. at the Cleveland Clinic.